Sunday, March 02, 2014

Door, study and danger


































Door in Sitges from the archives.

The room where I spend most of my time at the moment I call my study. For a good many reasons I discourage people from referring to it as a office. The function of every office which I used is quite different.

Perhaps because moving around is a problem for me at the moment I am increasingly  attracted by the current sport - called I think parcour -  of clambering over buildings and leaping the spaces between edges and projections. It looks very dangerous but has a nonchalant elegance about it which I find compelling.

4 comments:

Stella said...

How do you use your house differently now that it is your space alone?

marja-leena said...

I really like the variety of textures and shapes in this image. There is history there!

I hope movement is becoming easier day by day, Joe.

Roderick Robinson said...

Is it really called parcours?. I thought the word was something more obviously New York, or rather Brooklyn. It tempts me to be pretentious: an activity that combines sport and culture (as exemplified by architecture). Your bete noire was on telly recently making a contrarian's case for brutalist architecture. I feel quite guilty about enjoying him so much; all I can say is he doesn't dumb down. I still treasure the moment when your intellectual detachment - which had remained firm throughout your reading of Gorgon Times - suddenly broke down. I had Hatch suggesting an approach to presenting a telly programme as "like Jonathan Meades in drag." Not exactly complimentary but you wouldn't have it. I wasn't even allowed to mention his name. This was one of the very, very rare occasions when I exercised author's droit du seigneur.

Lucy said...

Oh gosh is JM Joe's bĂȘte noire? I never knew! I always feel assaulted by adjectives when I watch him. Or just assaulted really. And yet I keep coming back. It's like tasting andouille: I forget what a hideous experience it is and think maybe this time it will be better, but it never is.

A student who was once telling me in English how he spent his Christmas said how he had been doing some open sea rowing or something similarly exhausting and energetic on Christmas Eve, but then he still went to the office that evening. I was impressed but puzzled as I thought he was retired. Turned out he meant he went to midnight mass.