Friday, June 08, 2007

mock orange, thunder, yorkshire pudding

The smell of phladelphus or mock orange as you walk down Mount Sion.

Thunder last night: a single roll was all I heard. I like the way it fades into a growl, and is followed by the splashing of heavy rain

An English guest from the USA comes for roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. The pudding rises like a souffle helped by an extra egg. It is light and brown with just a hint of softness in the middle. Gravy is in love with it and it, with gravy.

3 comments:

Lucy said...

If I could choose just one flowering plant, i think it might well be philadelphus; in the house where I grew up it grew alongside box hedges, the two perfumes are deeply evocative, though rarely combined!
My heartfelt admiration for anyone who can produced a risen yorkshire pudding for company; mine are perfect for just us but always flat and leaden for guests. I no longer attempt them, except for one elderly Scots friend who loves stodgy food! Perhaps the extra egg might help...

Plutarch said...

I think the extra egg does help. In her book, English Food, Jane Grigson quotes a Chinese cook who won a Yorkshire pudding competetition in Leeds using four eggs with the usual half pint of milk, but uses 1/2 lb, instead of a quarter of a pound of flour. He also adds half a teaspoon of something called tai luk (from oriental stores).

Lucy said...

One of the TV chefs, I recall, gave a recipe for yorkshire pud with enormous quantities of egg in it, and I think he said it was one that was used in the restaurant and held up well. It might stop tasting like yorkshire and be more like a souffle or choux pastry, to my mind. I wonder what the mystery oriental ingredient actually does? I'm sure my mother wouldn't have approved but then again if Jane Grigson did...