Monday, June 25, 2007

weather,security,chard

They are grumbling about the weather. Weather (freak storms and tsunamis excluded) I like: weather forecasts, I do not. It seems uneccessary to spend time anticipating the worst or the best, when there is plenty to be getting on with. Sufficient unto the day... Any weather is better than no weather, and most of it - rain, like to day - storm or sunshine, can be beautiful, depending on where you are standing and what you are looking for.

Outside the jewelers in the High Street, there is always a burly security guard. Today he carries, anomolously, a pale green, dripping umbrella.

The first shiny-leafed chard from the garden today. It will be cooked with potatoes already boiled, finely chopped shallots, a little mint, and eggs, added at the last minute, and scrambled with the vegetables.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Going into my small backwater provincial town centre and seeing amongst a sea of white uptight pasty faces an elegant looking black lady and a very happy loved-up lesbian couple walking without a care in the world.

Getting out of the supermarket after a panic attack and feeling the refreshing wind and drizzle upon my face.

Finding out that I love the pungent taste of capers after trying them for the first time.

Anonymous said...

sorry to reply again on the same day of my first post after much lurking...

enjoying the stillness of the night knowing most real monsters are asleep

knowing my mother is ok after all be it minor key hole surgery which she did not tell me of beforehand of because she new I would worry , but at least I was the only one who said it was a good idea and she is already feeling the benefits.

making home-made tartar sauce with my new found culinary love capers

Plutarch said...

Thank you for your visit, and for the things which have given you pleasure. Capers are good.They are close relatives of nasturtiums, which grow wild in my garden, seeding themselves every year, and scrambling over fences and plants. The seeds can be used as substitutes for capers.Once, in Cyprus, I came across a caper plant growing wild. It had a gaudy flower larger than a nasturtium.

I know and love the fresh, clean feel of drizzle in the wind.