Wednesday, January 19, 2011

marmalade 3, mask, hope


Posted by Picasa In response to world wide demand here is the first jar of marmalade to be opened from this year's batch.

As I enter the alley which runs behind Mount Pleasant, a motor cyclist in a black helmet with a black visor which seems to incorporate smoked goggles, cruises past me, his engine idling. I am struck by the image of a mask with no vent for the eyes to see through. A blind motor cyclist!

It is after 4.30pm as I walk home. It is still daylight, the sky pink and eggshell blue. There is hope yet in this dark season.

6 comments:

Barrett Bonden said...

Struck by the image; lucky not to be struck by the motorcyclist.

The Crow said...

Reading your accounts of marmalade-making caused a yearning here for some, though what I brought home from the market yesterday cannot be as good as yours. It will have to do.

Your photo would make a lovely still life in oils, I think. I especially like how the sun light shines through the marmalade onto the tablecloth. A lovely composition, Joe; thank you.

Lucy said...

That marmalade is a miracle of clarity. Mine is always much murkier. Maybe I should put the pips in muslin after all. Tastes all right anyway.

It was a lovely bright late afternoon, wasn't it?

CC said...

Though, not fond of marmalade myself, your earlier description and now this tempting photo are causing me to reconsider.

Here's a blog I've recently discovered, that you might enjoy.
http://www.theydrawandcook.com/2011/01/pretty-cupcakes-by-joana-faria.html

tristan said...

artesanal bread ?

Plutarch said...

BB He was travelling quite slowly or I might have been alarmed rather than curious.

Crow Most marmalade made elsewhere than in England is I suspect made with ordinary sweet oranges rather than than with the bitter Seville oranges, which give the conserve its characteristic bitter sweet flavour. If you email me your address I will attempt a safe package and mail you a jar.

Lucy I wonder if the clarity comes from the method of cooking the oranges whole and chopping them when soft enough to pierce the skin easily. But perhaps you do that any way. The pips and pith in the muslin is, as I understand it, to provide pectin to help in setting.

CC Thanks for the link.

Tristan If I qualify as an artisan, the answer is yes.