Monday, April 15, 2013

Peeling, politics and pesto

Peeling. Pursuing the idea of abstract or semi-abstract patterns on weathered surfaces, it occurs to me that the closer you look, the more you see. It is rather like molecular patterns  revealed when a material is examined under a microscope,  In this instance  the  patterns of peeling paint framed in this way suggests to me at least three other images.  And oh my goodness don't those streaks of white in th ebackground look like  streaks of cirrus cloud! Watch this space.

The sheer venom of those who hated the late Margaret Thatcher is only matched by the unqualified praise given to her political career and achievements.  Did she destroy the trade unions or merely the power  of union leaders  who abused democratic principles and paralysed industry?   Good stories  told to her credit and nasty slogans over simplifying her destructive impact on industry, jostle for prominence in anticipation of her funeral on Wednesday.  History will judge her. One good joke meanwhile  can hardly  be be described as inoffensive. "Iron Lady, Rust in Peace".

Mother to child sucking at a piece of confectionery as they negotiate a corner of the road. "Leave it now. We're having pesto and pasta for supper, and if you don't eat it, there'll be hell to pay."

5 comments:

Lucas said...

Remarkable picture. The polar bear sitting on the ice-berg in the foreground is unmistakable. I think the rust joke is good; a sense of humour is the key ingredient.

Ellena said...

Lucas might be right but why am I seeing a sinking bus with a dog waiting to be saved?

Roderick Robinson said...

I have more or less given up trying to comment on your blog; I am simply denied your comment box unless (as in this case) others have already commented.

As to Mrs T there is surely one failing both extremes are agreed on. She lacked a sense of humour, almost to the point that she became transcendentally funny. On one occasion she was being coached (possibly for PMQ) for a response where there was an advantage in likening her opponent to Moses. This much she understood. The punchline was "Keep on taking the tablets." which she objected to, wanted to say "Keep on taking the pills." and no amount of explanation would dissuade her. For me private relationships always depend on a shared sense of humour and it was Mrs T who made me realise that this criterion extended to public relationships as well.

Joe Hyam said...

Ellena Lucas Thank you for your interpretations. Let'ssee what happens now.

Robbie It concerns me that you are having problems commenting. Your comments are valuable to me and I am sure to other commentators, as well as entertaining. I am trying to take up the suggestions in the link you provided, and may already have done so, but I am a little ham-fisted here. It may take time.

Lucy said...

I can't help but see the third vignette as some kind of oblique metaphor for Thatcher's legacy...