Tuesday, October 28, 2008

missing, grass flowers, tomato

Posted by Picasa... and forlorn.

Although, in one form or another, we eat the seed, we often forget, because they are usually so inconspicuous, that grasses have flowers. Today, while putting another book away, I take off the shelf The Penguin Dictionary of Natural History and open it at random. It opens on a page with a diagram of a typical grass flower. The names of the different parts of the flower - awn, glume, lemma and palea - more than make up for the flower's small impact.

We are still eating the rare varieties of tomato which were on display at last Saturday's Farmers' Market. One, though ripe, is green and remains green. Another - a plum tomato - is green but generously streaked with red like a sunset sky. All have good flavours and thin skins.

3 comments:

Lucy said...

Those grass flower parts are wonderful words, aren't they? They sound like terms from somekind of unknown cosmogeny...

Plutarch said...

Perhaps names from a myth or fairy story. Lemma and Palea made their way, hand in hand, through the dark and sodden forest, where they knew for certain that the Awns and Glumes lay in wait for them.

Lucy said...

Yes!