Saturday, October 25, 2008

under the maple, apples, grazing

Posted by Picasa Leaves curl round the bole of this maple in the Grove.

In the Farmers' Market, there is a stall with 4o or more different, locally grown, apple varieties - pippins, and reinettes, blenheims, pearmains, joanettings and russets to mention a few. It is a reminder that oases remain among the fading orchards of The garden of England.

From the train I pass a field of sheep and then a field of cows. In each case the animals evenly scatter across the field. Tidy, you might say, and then realize that it their way of optimising the efficiency of their grazing.

4 comments:

Dave King said...

Good to know that these oases do still exist. Some small cause for optimism, perhaps.

Plutarch said...

Kent, of course, is home to the National Fruit Collection at Brogdale Farm, near Faversham. It is open to the public and, as long as it continues to exist, will ensure the survival of hundreds of apple varieties.

Lucy said...

My dad was called Harry Masters, and came from Somerset. We recently found out there is a kind of Somerset cider apple called a Harry Masters Red! You can still buy the tree from specialist orchards, I believe...

Plutarch said...

Though I've always wanted to, I haven't yet been to Brogdale. If I do I'll look out for Harry Masters