Tuesday, January 15, 2013

close-up Canada warden

Yesterday's  round-faced wayside cat shows an interest in lenses.

Several days ago I referred to Richard Ford's latest novel Canada which I had only just started at the time. Marja-Leena asked to what extent it was about Canada.  This afternoon I finished it; and because it was so gripping, after a longer than usual reading session. To answer her question, the last half is set in  Canada. It Saskatchewan to be precise. It has quite a lot to say about the country  and Canadians though in a somewhat oblique way. It is a novel which I recommend without hesitation and will gladly confirm that its memorable opening sentence will not lead to disappointment: "First I'll tell you about the robbery our parents committed. Then about the murders, which happened later."

A traffic warden is hanging around a car parked on a double yellow line and half way across the pavement too. He eyes me as though I could be its owner.  Why is it that I feel guilty as though it might belong to me?  It isn't mine and I haven't owned a car for 10 years. I never liked authority. Perhaps the guilt erupts from within from time to time.

6 comments:

tristan said...

try the priestly approach ... amble up to him/her and ask them gently, "is there anything you would like to tell me, my child ?"

CC said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
CC said...

Great cat face.

Anonymous said...

I am glad to see you are still posting (it has been awhile since I checked in). With regard to Richard Ford's 'Canada' I believe he was tilting his hat to Thomas Hardy and 'The Major of Casterbridge' in particular. RF is a clever writer.

Joe Hyam said...

Hi anon. The narrator in Canada who becomes a teacher refers to Hardy towards the end of the story. He teaches Hardy to his pupils and quotes him in connection with the narrative of his own story. It is a remarkably moving novel.

Anonymous said...

Richard Ford said he wanted to investigate the impact on an individual who was forced to live because of the actions of another -- the Mayor and the parents in each instance. If you pull the Hardy off the shelf you will find a reference to Canada. (I am Anonymous because I seem to have lost my Google password and can't be bothered to get a new one.)